Key Players

 National Conservation Advisory Council (1973-1981)

National Institute for Conservation (1982- 1996)

Heritage Preservation (1997- 2015)

A

Dr. Edward Porter Alexander (1907- 2003) served as director of the New York State Historical Association at Ticonderoga and Cooperstown from 1934-1941, Director of the Historical Society of Wisconsin from 1941 -1946, and Vice-president for interpretation at Colonial Williamsburg from 1946–1972. He founded the Museum Studies program at the University of Delaware which he directed from 1972-1978. He served as President of the American Association of Museums and the American Association for State and Local History. His publications include Museums in Motion: An Introduction to the History and Functions of Museums (1979), Museum Masters: Their Museums and Their Influence (1983), and The Museum in America: Innovators and Pioneers (1997). He earned a BA from Drake University (Des Moines, IA), an MA from the University of Iowa, and a PhD from Columbia University. He was awarded an honorary degree from Drake University and was elected as a fellow of the Rochester Museum of Arts and Sciences (now the Rochester Museum & Science Center).

B

Norbert S. Baer (NCAC Board Member 1973-1976, NCAC Library and Archives Study Committee 1973-1978, Chair of NCAC Education Study Committee 1973-1979) retired as Hagop Kevorkian Professor of Conservation at New York University’s Institute of Fine Arts Conservation Center in 2019 after 50 years of research and teaching at the Conservation Center. He came to the Conservation Center in 1965 as a research assistant to Professor Seymour Lewin and began teaching at the Center in 1969. He was named Hagop Kevorkian Professor of Conservation in 1986. In addition to numerous senior administrative positions, he assumed overall responsibility for the programming and construction of the Stephen Chan House, home of the Conservation Center. He has served in an advisory capacity to important agencies including the American Research Center in Egypt, the Indo-U.S. Sub-commission on Education and Culture, the U.S. National Archives, the European Commission Directorate on Environmental Research, and the Committee on Natural Disasters. A Guggenheim Fellowship in 1983–1984 allowed him to focus his attention on larger issues of preservation policy, particularly the introduction of concepts of risk management to the conservation of cultural materials. One manifestation of that approach was the development of a program for the Dahlem Conference on Rational Decision-Making in the Preservation of Cultural Property. He also participated in expert meetings of the NATO Committee on the Challenges of Modern Society (NATO/CCMS). As a member of the National Materials Advisory Board, he chaired the Committee on Currency Features Usable by the Visually Impaired. In 2010, he and Hannelore Roemich coordinated The Interface Between Field Archaeology and Conservation, a symposium held at the NYU Abu Dhabi campus. When the United Nations established the United Nations Compensation Commission, he served as their expert evaluating the claims by Iran, Kuwait, and Syria against the Republic of Iraq for damages to cultural properties caused by the oil fires set in Kuwait by Iraqi Forces. In 2014, he was invited to participate in the Seminar on the Protection of the Environment in Relation to Armed Conflict held at the United Nations under the auspices of the International Law Commission. These direct experiences led to his seminar on The Preservation of Cultural Property in Times of Armed Conflict in 2016. He earned a BS from Brooklyn College in 1959, an MS from the University of Wisconsin in 1962, and a Ph.D. from New York University in 1969.

 

Susan J. Bandes (NIC Treasurer 1987-1989) is Professor of Art History and Director of Museum Studies at Michigan State University. She served as Director of MSU's Kresge Art Museum (now the Broad Art Museum) from 1986 until 2010 where she curated numerous exhibitions and wrote many catalogues. She is a member of the Print Council of America and is a frequent assessor and accreditor for the American Alliance of Museums. She earned MA and PhD degrees from Bryn Mawr College, specializing in Roman Baroque painting.

 

Paul N. Banks (NCAC Board Member 1973-1978, NCAC Library and Archives Study Committee 1973-1978, NCAC Education Study Committee 1973-1979) (1934-2000) studied at Carnegie Institute of Technology in Pittsburgh before working in book production and typography in New York City for Viking Press and Clark & Way from 1956–1960. During this time he took evening courses at Columbia in book related topics. From 1960-1964, he held part-time jobs giving bookbinding lessons and writing reports for the Journal of the Guild of Book Workers. He joined the Newberry Library as conservator in 1964. He remained at the Newberry until 1981 and held the position of Head of the Conservation Department and Laboratory when he left to establish the conservation and preservation program at the Columbia University School of Library Science. When the program moved to the University of Texas at Austin in 1992, he moved too and taught there until his retirement in 1996. He was appointed the first National Archives Fellow in Preservation in 1998. He was a founding member of the American Institute for Conservation, serving as Treasurer from 1977-1979 and as President from 1979-1981. He published numerous articles on book and paper conservation. The Association for Library Collections & Technical Services (ALCTS), a division of the American Library Association established The Paul Banks and Carolyn Harris Preservation Award in his honor.


Elisabeth Batchelor (Heritage Preservation Board Member 1997-1998) studied conservation in Vienna and Rome and earned a Master of Arts degree in conservation and technology at the Academy of Fine Arts, Vienna. From 1975- 1995, she was associated with the Cincinnati Art Museum, serving as assistant director of collections from 1989- 1995. From 1995 to 1998 she was a museum project consultant for institutions such as the University of Cincinnati, Perdue University Galleries, and the Dayton Art Institute. She was Director of conservation and collections at the Nelson-Atkins Museum from 1998- 2015. Since 2015 she has been a museum consultant. She is the author of Art conservation: the race against destruction: an explanation of conservation for the layman of some of the procedures and responsibilities of a conservator (1978).


Arthur C. Beale (NCAC President 1981, NIC President 1982- 1985, NCAC Education Study Committee 1973-1979) received his apprentice training in conservation at Harvard's Fogg Art Museum where he worked for twenty years (1966- 1986), becoming Director of the Center for Conservation and Technical Studies (now the Straus Center for Conservation), In 1986, he joined the conservation department at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. He retired from his position of Chair of Conservation and Collections Management at the MFA in 2006. He was also a Senior Lecturer on Fine Arts at Harvard and helped develop the formal post-graduate training programs at the Harvard University Art Museums and at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. He was founding Chairman of the Board and Council of the National Institute for Conservation. He is a Fellow of both the International and American Institutes for Conservation. He held a Presidential appointment to the National Museum Services Board from 1989 until 1996. In 1995, he was named the first recipient of the University Products, Inc. Award for distinguished achievement in the field of conservation. He has lectured widely and published on a variety of subjects including the preservation of outdoor statuary, the technical and authentication examination of objects, and environmental control methods. He earned a BA from Brandeis University in 1965 and an MA from Boston University.


James Bernstein (NIC Board Member 1987-1989) was Conservator and Co-Director of Conservation for the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art from 1975 to 1989. In 1989, he opened a private conservation practice and began to develop master classes for conservators. For almost two decades, he has taught color and compensation technique to hundreds of conservators through his Mastering Inpainting Workshops. He earned his undergraduate degree from Brandeis University, Waltham, MA and was awarded a Masters and Advanced Study Degree in Art Conservation from the Cooperstown Graduate Program (now the Buffalo Graduate Program). In 2007, he received the American Institute for Conservation Sheldon and Caroline Keck Award in recognition of his sustained record of excellence in the education and training of conservation professionals.

 

Livingston Ludlow Biddle, Jr.  (1918-2002) was a journalist and author from 1946-1962. In 1963, he joined the staff of Senator Claiborne Pell and helped draft the legislation that created the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA). From 1966-1967, he was deputy to the NEA’s first Chairman, Roger L. Stevens. He was Professor and Chairman of the Division of Arts at Fordham University from 1968-1970 and Chair of the Philadelphia Ballet 1971- 1972 before returning to work for Senator Pell. In 1975, he was appointed Congressional Liaison Director for the NEA and in 1976, Director of the Senate Subcommittee on Education, Arts and Humanities. He was Chairman of the NEA from 1977- 1981. He earned a BA from Princeton University in 1940.
 

Ingrid E. Bogel (Heritage Preservation Board Member 2001-2003) worked in the Conservation Department of the Philadelphia Museum of Art before joining the staff of the Conservation Center for Art and Historic Artifacts (CCAHA) in Philadelphia as Assistant Director in 1991. In 1998 she became Executive Director, a position she held until her retirement in 2014. She served on the Advisory Committee to the Western States and Territories Preservation Assistance program based at the University of California, Berkeley and on the steering committee for a project to assist libraries at historically black colleges and universities with their preservation needs. She has been a member of the Boards of Directors of Wyck Historic House & Garden, the Abraham Lincoln Foundation, the Greater Philadelphia Cultural Alliance, and Heritage Preservation. She was Chair of the Regional Alliance for Preservation, a consortium of non-profit organizations that provide education and training to curators, librarians, archivists, and historic site managers. She served as a panelist/reviewer for the Philadelphia Cultural Fund and has served as a grant reviewer for The Getty Foundation and the Institute of Museum and Library Services. She earned an MFA degree from the School for American Crafts, Rochester Institute of Technology.

Michael Botwinick (NCAC Board Member 1979-1980) has been an Adjunct Associate Professor of Public Policy at NYU’s Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Policy since 2011.  He was Director of the Hudson River Museum from 2001-2016, Director of the Staten Island Institute of Arts and Sciences from 1998- 2001, Director of the Center for Orange County Center Regional Studies from 1997-1998, Director of the Newport Harbor Art Museum from 1991- 1997, President of the Fine Arts Group from 1988-1991,  Director of the Corcoran Gallery of Art in Washington, DC from 1983- 1987, Director of the Brooklyn Museum from 1974- 1983, Assistant Director at the Philadelphia Museum of Art from 1971- 1974, and Associate Curator of Medieval Art at the Cloisters  then Assistant Curator-in-Chief at the Metropolitan Museum of Art from 1969- 1971. He taught at Columbia and City College and organized exhibitions with museums throughout Europe, Asia and Africa, including the first American exhibitions to go to China. He has served as an advisor to the U.S. Department of State on its Art in Embassies Program, the International Research and Exchange Board on Cultural Exchange, the Egyptian Government on cultural policy, the World Bank on the renovation for the Cairo Museum, Yale University on its Art Gallery, and others. He served on the committee that drafted the first Code of Ethics for the American Association of Museums. He has served as a Board Member for the AAM, AAMD, Museums Collaborative and US-ICOM among others. He was Vice President of the Museum Association of New York State from 2008 to 2013. He earned a BA from Rutgers College and an MA from Columbia University.

 

Richard D. Buck (NCAC Education Study Committee 1973-1979) (1903-1977), a Harvard graduate in the class of 1926 and a student of the new conservation classes at Harvard University and the Fogg Art Museum, became a conservator at the Fogg Art Museum in 1937 and remained there until 1952—with a year’s absence in 1949 to serve as an advisor at the National Gallery in London. In 1952, he was the founding Director of the Intermuseum Conservation Association in Oberlin, OH. He left Oberlin in 1975 to establish a similar regional center, the Balboa Art Conservation Center in San Diego, CA.  He was Director at the time of his death.

Bonnie Burnham (NIC By Laws Committee 1985) earned degrees from the University of Florida and the Sorbonne and worked in Paris at the International Council of Museums, for which she compiled and edited The Protection of Cultural Property, Handbook of National Legislation (1974). In 1975 she became Executive Director of the International Foundation for Art Research (IFAR). That same year, her book, The Art Crisis was published. While at IFAR, she developed its Art Theft Archive program and published Art Theft: Its Scope, Its Impact and Its Control (1978). In 1985, she became Executive Director of the International Fund for Monuments (now the World Monuments Fund). Under her leadership, it established national affiliate organizations in Western Europe, Eastern Europe, Cambodia, the former Yugoslavia, and Iraq. In 1996, she established the World Monuments Watch, which calls attention to heritage emergencies and opportunities. She retired in 2015. Her honors include Chevalier of the Order of Arts and Letters presented by the French government (1989), Distinguished Alumna of the College of Fine Arts of the University of Florida (1995), the first University of Florida Beinecke-Reeves Distinguished Achievement Award in Historic Preservation (2004), and an honorary doctorate of humane letters from Florida Southern College (2009). She is a Fellow of the U. S. Committee, International Council on Monuments and Sites. She was a member of the United States Commission for UNESCO and served on the boards of the National Institute of Conservation and the Hearst Castle Preservation Foundation, and the New York Studio School.
 

Marigene H. Butler (NCAC/NIC Board Member 1973-1984, NCAC Vice President 1976, NCAC President 1979-1980, NCAC Regional Center Study Committee 1973-1976, NCAC Scientific Support Study Committee 1973-1979) earned a BA in art history from Mount Holyoke College in 1953. From 1966-1968 she apprenticed in paintings conservation at the Fogg Art Museum and the Art Institute of Chicago, spending two years at each institution. She worked at the Art Institute of Chicago from 1968-1973 and then joined the Intermuseum Conservation Association in Oberlin, OH where she was Director and the head of the ICA’s graduate training program. From 1978 until her retirement in 1997, she served as head of conservation at the Philadelphia Museum of Art (PMA). After training in polarizing microscopy with the microscopist Walter McCrone of the McCrone Institute, she developed the course, "Polarized Light Microscopy for Conservators”.  She published many articles and essays on the technical examination of paintings. She is a fellow of the American Institute for Conservation, the International Institute for Conservation, and the Royal Microscopical Society. She was a member of the Council of the International Institute for Conservation for nearly a decade. A member of the board of trustees of the National Conservation Advisory Council from 1973 to 1981, she served as its chairman during the last two of those years and continued on the board of trustees of its successor organization, the National Institute for Conservation. She served on Mount Holyoke College’s Art Museum Advisory Board as chairman of the Building Committee. She was also a member of the board of trustees of the Wyck House, a once-neglected Germantown historic site in Philadelphia.
organization. He has written or co-authored eleven books, and almost 100 articles. He was awarded the 2009 Historical Society of Michigan Lifetime Achievement Award and an Award of Merit from the AASLH Leadership in History Awards. He earned  a BA from Boston University (1951), and an MA (1953) and PhD (1958) in history from the University of Michigan.

C

Marshall Elliott Carroll, FAIA (NCAC Board Member 1976-1979, Chair of NCAC Architectural Conservation 1973-1980) (1923-2004) earned BA and Master of Architecture degrees from Harvard University. He served as a submarine officer in the U.S. Navy during World War II and the Korean War, and continued to serve as an officer in the U.S. Naval Reserve until 1973. He practiced architecture in North Carolina before moving to Washington, D.C., in 1960 to join the executive staff of the American Institute of Architects where he served as Deputy Executive Vice President. He was a partner in the architectural practice of Vincent G. Kling & Partners of Philadelphia and served as Executive Assistant to the Architect of the Capitol from 1973 to 1988, where he was responsible for several major preservation projects, including the master plan for the Capitol. He was President of the Association for Preservation Technology, Chair of the Historic American Landscape Survey Foundation, and a member of the D.C. Zoning Commission, the D.C. Board of Zoning Adjustment, and the National Capital Memorial Commission. He was Vice President of the International Council on Monuments and Sites (ICOMOS) and Chair of its U.S. Committee.

Tom Clareson (Heritage Preservation Board Member 2002-2015, Treasurer 2005-2008, Secretary 2009-2012, Chair 2013-2015) 
 

Victor Charles Bamert Covey (NCAC Board Member 1976-1978, NCAC Vice President 1977-1978, NCAC Education Study Committee 1973-1979) was a master tool maker for the Glenn L. Martin Aircraft Company, Baltimore from 1940-1949, an art technician (1949-1953) and Chief Conservator of art (1953-1972) at the Baltimore Museum Art, and Chief of art conservation at the National Gallery of Art in Washington (1972-1983). He was a fellow of the American Institute for Conservation and the International Institute for Conservation. He was a member and President (1974-1975) of the Washington Conservation Guild. He was Vice President of the National Conservation Advisory Council from 1977-1978. He earned a Diploma from Baltimore City College in 1938, studied jewelry design and execution with Alvin Schmidt, a Baltimore jeweler in 1939, studied painting conservation with Russell Quandt at the Corcoran Gallery in 1959, studied art at the Institute du Patrimone de Artistique in Brussels in 1963, and studied at the New York University Institute of Fine Arts Conservation Center in 1968.

 

John J. Cullinane, AIA, (NCAC Architectural Conservation Study Committee 1973-1980) is the President of John Cullinane Architect, LLC, an Annapolis, Maryland-based architectural/engineering firm that has undertaken rehabilitation designs for thousands of old and historic buildings across the United States. Since 1993 he has taught historic building maintenance for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and preservation planning for the National Preservation Institute. From 1975 to 1992, he was senior architect for the President's Advisory Council on Historic Preservation in Washington, D.C.

George M. Cunha (NCAC Library and Archives Study Committee 1973-1978, NCAC Regional Centers Study Committee 1973-1976) (1912-1994) was a graduate of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the United States Naval War College. A combat pilot during World War II, he was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross. In 1963, after twenty-six years of service in the Navy as a pilot and underwater weapons specialist, he became Chief Conservator at the Library of the Boston Athenaeum. In 1973, he spearheaded the creation of the New England Document Conservation Center (now Northeast Document Conservation Center) and became its first Director. He retired from that position in 1980. He was a Fellow of the American Institute for Conservation, the Royal Society of Arts (London), the Society of American Archivists, and the Pilgrim Society.

D

Terry Drayman-Weisser (NCAC/NIC Board Member 1981-1984, NCAC Scientific Support Study Committee 1973-1979) teaches identification and preservation of hard organic matrices at the Winterthur/University of Delaware Art Conservation Training Program. In the past, she taught metals conservation. She was part of a Walters Art Museum/University of Maryland team that was awarded a patent on a method for coating metal objects. From the early 1970s until she retired with distinction in 2015, she was Director of Conservation and Technical Research at the Walters Art Museum. She played a major role in establishing the Iraqi Institute for the Conservation of Antiquities and Heritage (IICAH), a conservation training program in Erbil, Iraqi Kurdistan. She has lectured and published widely and is known for her work with metals, enamels, and ivory. She is a past president, Fellow, and Honorary Member of the American Institute for Conservation and has served on the Council of the International Institute for Conservation, where she remains a Fellow. She received AIC’s Robert Feller Lifetime Achievement Award as well the Sheldon and Caroline Keck Award for mentoring conservators entering the field.  She earned a BA in Art History from Swarthmore College. She took courses in physical metallurgy in the graduate program at Johns Hopkins University and received her diploma with distinction in archaeological conservation from the Institute of Archaeology at the University of London.

E

Inge-Lise Eckmann Lane (NIC/Heritage Preservation Chair 1987-2000) earned a BA from Bennington College in 1971 and an MA certificate of advanced study in Art Conservation from the State University of New York Cooperstown Graduate Program in 1974. She was a conservator at the Fine Arts Museum of San Francisco from 1975-1976. She was associated with the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art from 1976- 1996, serving as Co-Director of Conservation from 1976-1986, Chief Conservator from 1986-1989, and Deputy Director for Curatorial Affairs from 1989-1996. Since 1996, she has had a private practice in the conservation of contemporary art. She was President of the International Network for the Conservation of Contemporary Art (INCCA) from 2007-2014. She was President of the Western Association of Art Conservators and Chair of the Membership Committee of the American Institute for Conservation. She is a Fellow of the American Institute for Conservation and the International Institute for Conservation. In 2001 she received the Lifetime Achievement Award for Conservation Advocacy from the American Institute for Conservation and University Products. She served as Vice Chair of Heritage Preservation from 1994 to 1997 and as Chair from 1997 to 2000.

Margaret Holben Ellis (Heritage Preservation Board Member 2012-2015) joined the Paper Conservation staff at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in 1977 where she remained full-time until 1987 when she was appointed Sherman Fairchild Chairman of the New York University Institute of Fine Arts Conservation Center. Today, she serves there as Chair and Eugene Thaw Professor of Paper Conservation. In 1998, she was invited to plan the facilities and programs of the Thaw Conservation Center of the Morgan Library & Museum where she was Director from 2001 – 2016. She is a Fellow and current President of the American Institute for Conservation, a Fellow and past Council member of the International Institute for Conservation, and an Accredited Conservator/Restorer of the Institute of Conservation (ICON). Her awards include the AIC Rutherford John Gettens Merit Award (1997), the AIC Sheldon and Caroline Keck Award (2003), and the first Rome Prize of the American Academy in Rome to be awarded to a conservator (1994). She has published and lectured on artists ranging from Raphael and Titian to Pollock and Lichtenstein with her research on artists’ materials similarly far-ranging. She earned a BA in Art History from Barnard College, Columbia University (1975) and an MA in Art History and Advanced Certificate in Conservation at the Conservation Center of the New York University Institute of Fine Arts (1979).

 

Gretchen Gayle Ellsworth (NCAC Secretary 1973-1981, NIC Secretary 1982-1984) earned an MA from Stanford University in 1962. She taught at Stanford University in 1964, was a staff legislation aide in a congressional office from 1965—1968,  was a Fellowship Specialist and Higher Education Program Officer at the Smithsonian Institution in 1968, was Director of Fellowships and Grants at the Smithsonian from 1978—1984 and Deputy Director of the Smithsonian’s Directorate of International Activities in 1984. She was Associate Director of the National Zoo from 1988- 1993. She served as Secretary of the National Conservation Advisory Council and later National Institute for Conservation from 1973-1984.

F

Dr. Robert L. Feller (NCAC Board Member 1973-1978, President 1976-1978, Chair of NCAC Scientific Support Study Committee 1973-1976) (1919-2018) earned a BA from Dartmouth College in 1941, an MS from Dartmouth in 1943, and a PhD in physical-organic chemistry from Rutgers University in 1950. He became engaged in research on conservation-related problems after the completion of his PhD, initially as the National Gallery of Art Fellow at Mellon Institute in Pittsburgh in 1950. He was the Gallery’s first technical advisor for conservation and curatorial activities. In 1976 he became the founding Director of the Research Center on the Materials of the Artist and Conservator at Carnegie Mellon University (now Carnegie Mellon Research Institute). Following retirement in 1988, he was Director Emeritus of the Research Center. Publishing over 130 articles, his focus was always on the practical application of scientific methods to the work of conservators and included the testing and introduction of Acryloid B-72 to the field. He was an Honorary Fellow of both the International Institute for Conservation and the American Institute for Conservation. He was a past President of the American Group of IIC (the forerunner of AIC). In 1983, he received the Pittsburgh Award of the American Chemical Society in recognition of his research contributions and in 2000, the University Products Award from AIC for his service to conservation. The lifetime achievement award presented by the American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works is named for him.

Dennis Fiori (Heritage Preservation Board Member 1997-2005, Vice Chair 1997-2000, Chair 2001-2002) was Deputy Director for Programs at the Institute of Museum and Library Services in Washington DC, Deputy Director of the Maine Arts Commission, Director of the Concord Museum (1982-1994), Director and CEO of the Maryland Historical Society (1994- 2005), and head of the Massachusetts Historical Society in Boston from 2006 through his retirement in 2017. His extensive volunteer service has included roles with the Massachusetts Historical Commission, Peabody Essex Museum, American Association for State and Local History, CV Starr Center for the Study of the American Experience, Washington College, Chestertown, MD, WYPR, Baltimore affiliate of National Public Radio, and Heritage Preservation.

G

Edward Gilbert (NCAC President 1973-1975) (1917-2007) earned a BA from Iowa State College and a Masters degree at Northwestern University. He enlisted in the United States Marine Corps in 1941. He served combat duty in the South Pacific and later in the occupation of Japan. During his Marine Corps career, he attended many professional schools including the Air Force War College. Upon retirement from the Marine Corp after twenty years of service, became exhibits preparator and conservator at Old Sturbridge Village in Massachusetts. He subsequently became Chief Conservator and Director of Laboratories at the Greenfield Village and Henry Ford Museum in Dearborn, Michigan. He was an Adjunct Professor of history at Wayne State University, Chairman of the National Conservation Advisory Council, and a Consultant to the American Association for State and Local History and the American Society of Archivists. He was a Fellow of the International Institute for Conservation and a Fellow of the American Institute for Conservation.

H

Doris A. Hamburg (Heritage Preservation Board Member 2004-2010) Head of Preservation Matters Consulting, served as Director of Preservation Programs at the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) from 2001- 2016.  Prior to NARA, she worked in several preservation positions at the Library of Congress.  She earned a BA in mediaeval studies from Mount Holyoke College, an MA in art history from Columbia University, and an MS and Certificate in Conservation of Art and Historic Artifacts and a Certificate in Museum Studies from the University of Delaware/ Winterthur Museum program in art conservation.

Barbara Heller (Heritage Preservation Board Member 1997-2003, Secretary 1997-1999) is the Director and Conservator of Special Projects at the Detroit Institute of Arts where she has worked since 1976. Hired as the head paintings conservator, she was promoted to Chief Conservator in 1985 and assumed her current position in 2009. Barbara was formerly paintings conservator at the Palazzo Pitti, Florence where she completed her training. She was an intern for the Committee to Rescue Italian Art working on flood-damaged books at Certosa di Galuzzo, and for Wayne State University at an Etruscan Foundation dig near Siena in 1968. She holds a certificate from Getty Leadership Institute and credentials from Olivet College, the University of Michigan, Wayne State University, and Harvard University. She is a founding member of the Michigan Alliance for the Conservation of Cultural Heritage and created and maintains the online Disaster Preparedness and Conservation Resource Center. In addition, she serves as secretary and chair of the collections committee of the Marshall Fredericks Sculpture Museum at Saginaw Valley State University and Chair of the Public Arts Board in the City of Birmingham, Michigan. She is a past board member of Michigan Legacy Art Park in Thompsonville, Michigan. She has been a member of the American Institute for Conservation’s External Advisory Council, a Regional Guild Representative, and Painting Specialty Group Chair, as well as board member of AAM/ICOM and Heritage Preservation and past President of the Midwest Regional Conservation Guild.

Frances Ann Hitchcock (NCAC/NIC Board Member 1981-1984) has been associated with the National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior since 1980, first as Chief Curator and then as Senior Advisor Scientific Collections and Environmental Safeguards. She earned a BA in Anthropology from Stanford in 1968.

Charles Hummel (NCAC Vice President 1981, NIC Vice President 1982-1984, NCAC Education Study Committee 1973-1979) now Curator Emeritus at the Henry Francis DuPont Winterthur Museum and Gardens, earned an MA from the Winterthur/ University of Delaware Program in American Culture in 1955. He began his career at Winterthur in 1958 as Assistant Curator and rose to Senior Deputy Director.  He organized the November 1973 meeting at Winterthur at which the National Conservation Advisory Council was formed. At Winterthur he created the Scientific Advisory Committee which helped pioneer the use of scientific techniques on material culture research, established the Scientific Research and Analysis Laboratory, and was involved in the founding of the Winterthur/UD Program in Art Conservation (WUDPAC). He served on the National Museum Services Board from 1994-1999. In 2012, he received the Allied Professional Award from the American Institute for Conservation and the Award for Distinguished Service to Museums from the American Alliance of Museums. In 2013, he received an honorary doctorate in fine arts from the University of Delaware at which he is an Adjunct Full Professor teaching graduate students. His major publications are With Hammer in Hand: The Dominy Craftsmen of East Hampton, A Winterthur Guide to American Chippendale Furniture, and The Pennsylvania Germans: A Celebration of Their Arts, 1683–1850 (co-author Beatrice Garvan).

Jane Hutchins (NIC Board Member 1987-1989) principal of Tideview Conservation in Sooke, British Columbia, Canada since the early 1990s was previously Conservator at the Merrimack Valley Textile Museum and Chief Conservator at its successor. the Museum of American Textile History (North Andover, MA). In 1986, she was co-Chair of the IMLS conservation review panel. She is the co-author of First aid for art: essential salvage techniques. She is also a weaver and since 2001 her Tidewater Farm has bred registered Icelandic sheep.

K

Caroline Keck (NCAC Board Member 1973-1976, NCAC Regional Centers Study Committee 1973-1976) (1908-2007) was educated at Vassar College, Radcliffe College from which she earned a master’s degree in art history, and the University of Berlin.  She met her husband, Sheldon while both were taking classes at the Fogg. They were painting conservators for the Brooklyn Museum (beginning in 1934), the Museum of Modern Art, the Guggenheim Museum, and the New York State Historical Association in Cooperstown, and did work for other museums and private owners.  They taught the conservation courses at the Brooklyn Museum which became the basis of the curriculum at the New York University Institute of Fine Arts Conservation Center.  They also founded the Cooperstown Graduate Program in Conservation, and served as advisors when the Winterthur/University of Delaware Program in Art Conservation was started. Together they published numerous articles and several books and produced six films about painting conservation. She wrote several books including How to Take Care of Your Pictures (1954), Handbook on the Care of Paintings (1965), A Primer on Museum Security (1966) and Safeguarding Your Collection in Travel (1970). She served as personal conservator for the painters Georgia O’Keeffe and Edwin Dickinson and for the art collection of Nelson A. Rockefeller. She was a member of the International Institute for Conservation, American Institute for Conservation, the American Association of Museums, and other professional organizations.

 

Sheldon Waugh Keck (NCAC Chair 1977-1981, NCAC Education Study Committee 1973-1979) (1910-1993) completed two degrees from Harvard University and was selected for an apprenticeship in restoration at the Fogg Museum of Art. After a year studying abroad in Italy and England, he was appointed as the first conservator at the Brooklyn Museum of Art. He enlisted in the U.S. Army in July 1943 and was selected for service as a Monuments Officer for the Office of Military Government, U.S. Zone (OMGUS). After his return to the United States, he resumed his career at the Brooklyn Museum of Art and together with his wife and partner Caroline Keck, he established an internationally-recognized conservation laboratory. The Kecks also served as consulting conservators on projects at some of America’s greatest cultural institutions including the Museum of Modern Art, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, the Phillips Collection in Washington, DC, the New York State Historical Association, and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. In 1961, he left the Brooklyn Museum to become Director of the Conservation Center of the New York University Institute of Fine Arts. In 1969, the Kecks established the Latin American Center for Conservation of Cultural Property in Mexico City under the auspices of UNESCO. From 1969 to 1981, the Kecks operated the Cooperstown Conservation training program under the auspices of the State University College at Oneonta  and the New York State Historical Association. He was a Fulbright Fellow (1959) and a Guggenheim Fellow (1960). He was the first President of the American Institute for Conservation. For their indelible contributions to art conservation, the Kecks were jointly awarded the New York State Award in 1975 and the Katherine Coffey Award in 1984. In 1994, the AIC inaugurated the Sheldon and Caroline Keck Award for excellence in the education and training of conservation professionals in their honor. 

Tom Klarner (Heritage Preservation Board Member 2007-2012, Treasurer 2009-2012) (1954- 2014) was founder and owner of Best Checks, Inc., a  manufacturer of laser and inkjet computer checks. He was an art collector and a generous donor to the National Gallery of Art, Heritage Preservation and many other art and charitable organizations.

Russell V. Keune, F.A.I.A (NCAC Architectural Conservation Study Committee 1973-1980) (1938-2015) held key positions at the National Park Service (1965- 1969) and the National Trust for Historic Preservation (1969-1983) before he was recruited in 1986 to work for US/ICOMOS (of which he was a founding member) as Vice President of Programs. He was the co-author of an ICOMOS site managers’ handbook entitled Tourism at World Heritage Cultural Sites. He became Director of International Relations for the AIA in 1993 and retired from the AIA in 2000. He served on the International Union of Architects’ Professional Practice Commission and was a member of the Board and Chair of the Vesterheim Norwegian-American Museum in Decorah, Iowa. He was a Fellow of US/ICOMOS and of the American Institute of Architects. He earned both a Bachelor's degree in Architecture (1961) and a Masters degree in Architecture from the University of Illinois.

Antoinette C. King (NCAC Scientific Support Study Committee 1973-1979) (1932- 2014) was Conservator of Prints and Drawings at the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) from 1968 until 1984 when she was named Director of Conservation, a position she held until her retirement in 1996. She served as an adjunct faculty member at the Conservation Center of the New York University Institute of Fine Arts from 1977 to 1998 where she taught paper conservation treatment courses and led six colloquia (open to both art history and conservation students) on the conservation of twentieth-century art. As a young conservator she trained with both Margaret Watherston and Marilyn Weidner.

Phillip A. Knachel (NCAC Library and Archives Study Committee 1973-1978) was associated with the Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington ,D.C. from 1959-1993 moving from Chief of Technical Services to  Associate  Director. After his retirement, he worked as a freelance French translator. He earned a BS from Northwestern University in 1948, an MA from Johns Hopkins University in 1954, and a PhD from Johns Hopkins in 1954. He was awarded an honorary Doctor of Letters by Amherst College in 1984.   

Jay Krueger (1997-2000) was appointed Senior Conservator of modern paintings at the National Gallery of Art in Washington in 1992 and has served as head of painting conservation since 2013. He is a Fellow of the American Institute for Conservation and has served on governing boards and advisory panels for numerous arts and conservation organizations and government arts agencies, including Heritage Preservation, the AIC, the Morris Louis Conservation Fund, and Hand Print Workshop. He also served as President of the AIC from 1997-1999. He has lectured on the painting materials and techniques of many modern and contemporary artists and regularly advises artists on the selection and use of materials. He earned a BFA in Printmaking and a BA in Art History from Washington University in St Louis, and an MA with a certificate of advanced study in painting conservation from the State University of New York, Cooperstown Graduate Program.

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Lesley Langa, President of NovaKultura Consulting and  a social science researcher working in cultural policy was  Director of Heritage Preservation’s Heritage Health Information Survey (HHI II) from 2013-2015. She was Project Director, Humanities Data Initiative for National Endowment for the Humanities from 2015-2016. Prior to her work at Heritage Preservation, she served as a research specialist at the Institute of Museum and Library Services (2008-2009) and a Senior Research Associate for the Information Policy & Access Center (iPAC) of the University of Maryland (2009-2012). After completing her work on the Survey, she joined the National Endowment for the Humanities as Project Director of the Humanities Data Initiative. She earned a BA in Humanities and BS from Florida State University in 2005, an MA from Florida State University in 2006, and is a PhD candidate at the University of Maryland’s iSchool.

Maribelle Leavitt (Heritage Preservation Board Member 2002-2003) was Assistant Clinical Professor at the School of Nursing at the University of California-San Francisco. She and her husband Stephen Leavitt are philanthropists. She earned a BA from Cornell University in 1965, an MS from Boston University in 1969, and a Doctorate in Nursing Science from the University of California-San Francisco in 1988.

 

William Leisher (NIC Board Member 1982-1989, Vice Chair 1987-1989, President 1989) (1941-1992) was assistant conservator for paintings at the National Gallery of Art in Washington from 1973 to 1980. He was head of conservation at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art from 1980- 1985, overseeing the design, construction and staffing of the museum's new conservation center. From 1985 through his death he was paintings conservator and the Executive Director of the Department of Conservation at the Art Institute of Chicago. In 1982, he was named to the board of the National Institute for Conservation, becoming its president in 1989. He served in the Navy for four years before attending Michigan State University from which he earned a BA, a BFA, and an MA in medieval English literature.

Jane S. Long (1950-2016) was Special Projects Coordinator for the President’s Committee on the Arts and the Humanities, and Executive Director of the Foundation for Public Affairs before becoming Vice President of Emergency Programs and the founding Director of the Heritage Emergency National Task Force at Heritage Preservation. In 2011, she became head of the Preservation Programs Communication and Outreach initiative of the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). She is co-author of Caring for Your Family Treasures (Harry N. Abrams, 2000). She earned a BA from the College of Wooster and an MA from the University of Chicago.

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Lawrence J. Majewski (NCAC Regional Centers Study Committee 1973-1978) (1919-1999) joined the staff of the newly created New York University Institute of Fine Arts Conservation Center in 1960 and was appointed Chairman in 1966, a position he held until his retirement in 1986. Prior to joining the Conservation Center, he was a paintings conservation at the Metropolitan Museum of Art beginning in 1952 and  Deputy Director of the Byzantine Institute of America (Istanbul, Turkey) from 1956-1960. He was Chief Conservator of the Harvard University archaeological expedition to Sardis, Turkey from 1964-1989.  In 1966 he organized and led a group of seventeen American conservators to aid the rescue effort after the flood in Florence. He was a consultant to a wide variety of international projects including the Buddhist Shrine of Borobodur (Indonesia) in 1973 and the Ajanta Caves (India) in 1975, and was advisor to numerous projects in Venice and Poland. He was a founding member of the American Institute of Conservation and served as the first U.S. delegate to ICCROM. He was an active member of the ICOM Working Group on Icons and the ICCROM Group on mosaics. He was an editor for Art and Archaeology Technical Abstracts for almost two decades. He was a Fellow of the International Institute for Conservation and was appointed Honorary Fellow of American Institute for Conservation in 1987. In 1999, he received the Archaeological Institute of America’s Conservation Award. He was the author of numerous articles including the series, “On Conservation,” which was a feature of the American Association of Museum’s journal, Museum News. He earned a BFA and MFA from Yale University.

Dr. Philip Parker Mason (Library and Archives Study Committee 1973-1978) founded the Walter P. Reuther Library of Labor and Urban Affairs at of Wayne State University in Detroit in 1975 and served as Director from 1975 until his retirement in 2006. He is Professor Emeritus at Wayne State, where he taught American History and Archival Administration from 1958 until 2006. From 1953- 1958, he was the Michigan State Archivist. He was President of the Society of American Archivists from 1970-1971 and is a Fellow of that organization. He has written or co-authored eleven books, and almost 100 articles. He was awarded the 2009 Historical Society of Michigan Lifetime Achievement Award and an Award of Merit from the AASLH Leadership in History Awards. He earned  a BA from Boston University (1951), and an MA (1953) and PhD (1958) in history from the University of Michigan.

 

James C. Massey (NCAC Architectural Conservation Study Committee 1973-1978) was hired as a Supervisory Architect by the Historic American Buildings Survey in 1953. In 1964, he became the head of the HABS program in Philadelphia and in 1966 went to Washington, DC to create a national program. He served as head of that program from 1967-1972. From 1973- 1978, he was Operations Director of the National Trust for Historic Preservation. In 1978, he became Executive Director of the Stephen Decatur House in Washington, DC. In 1980, he and Constance Werner Ramirez co-founded the National preservation Institute which offers continuing education and professional training for those involved in the management, preservation, and stewardship of cultural heritage. In 1982, he became President of the Historic House Association of America. In 1988, he was hired by HABS/HAER to develop a definitive bibliography of publications produced by or related to HABS/HAER from 1935 to the present. He is the author of House Styles in America and a contributing editor to Old-House Journal.

Frank Matero (Heritage Preservation Secretary 2000-2003) is Professor of Architecture and Chair of the Graduate Program in Historic Preservation at the Stuart Weitzman School of Design at the University of Pennsylvania. He is Director and founder of the Center for Architectural Conservation, a member of the Graduate Group in the Department of Art History, and Research Associate of the University Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology. Previously he was Assistant Professor at Columbia University and Director of the Center for Preservation Research.  He is founder and editor-in-chief of Change Over Time published by University of Pennsylvania Press. He has served on numerous editorial and non-profit organization boards including the National Institute for Conservation, US/ICOMOS, the American Institute for Conservation, the Journal of Architectural Conservation, the Conservation and Management of Archaeological Sites, and Cultural Resource Management. He is a Professional Associate of the American Institute for Conservation and former Co-chair of its Research and Technical Studies Group. He earned a BS from SUNY Stony Brook, an MS from Columbia University, and studied at the New York University Institute of Fine Arts. He has been visiting faculty at the International Center for the Study of Preservation and the Restoration of Cultural Property (ICCROM/UNESCO), the Politechnic University of Puerto Rico, Yale University, and Carleton University and has been a visiting scholar at The Getty Conservation Institute and the Museum of New Mexico. He was appointed the first Architectural Conservator for the National Park Service and served as Scientific Director for the Aga Khan Historic Cities Support Program for the Ayyubid Wall, Cairo and Director of Conservation for the Gordion Archaeological Project/Penn Museum. He has lectured widely at universities and professional forums in the US and abroad. His awards include the G. Holmes Perkins Award for Distinguished Teaching, the Oliver Torrey Fuller Award for multiple publications, and the American Institute of Architects Education Honors Award.

Linda Merck-Gould (NIC Board Member  1985, By Laws Committee 1985) principal of Conservation Technical Associates LLC in Westport, CT provides preservation-oriented new facilities/renovation construction design consultation and museum-quality conservation treatment to galleries, private collectors, public institutions and museums. She is a Fellow of the AIC and IIC. A glass artist who has exhibited in solo and group exhibits, in 2018 she was a Visiting Artist and Scholar at the American Academy in Rome.

Ross Merrill (NIC President 1995) (1943- 2010) who was Chief of Conservation at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C.  from 1983-2009, came to the National Gallery in 1981 as a paintings conservator.   He trained as a painter at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts in Philadelphia. He worked as a registrar at the Fort Worth Museum of Modern Art and a preparator at the Kimbell Art Museum before earning an MA degree from Oberlin College  in 1974 while training at the Intermuseum Conservation Laboratory . After graduation, he was hired as paintings conservator by the Cleveland Museum of Art where he became Chief Conservator before moving to the National Gallery. 

Jan Merrill Oldham (Heritage Preservation Board Member 1997-2000) (1947-2011) earned a BA from the University of Connecticut in Storrs in 1969. She became interested in the preservation of library collections while working in the bindery at the University of Connecticut Library. A 1979 National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowship at the Yale University Library allowed her to undertake formal training in library and archives preservation. She earned a Masters in Library Science from the University of Rhode Island. She established and ran the University of Connecticut Libraries’ Preservation Department from 1985- 1995. She was the Malloy-Rabinowitz Preservation Librarian at Harvard University and directed the Weissman Preservation Center in the Harvard University Library and the Preservation & Imaging Services Department in the Harvard College Library from November 1995 until February 2010. She co-authored the Guide to the ANSI/NISO/LBI Library Binding Standard, a document used by almost all libraries and commercial library binders. She served on key committees within ALCTS, ALA, the Association of Research Libraries, the Council on Library and Information Resources, the National Information Standards Organization and many others. In December 2010, she was the recipient of the ALCTS Ross Atkinson Lifetime Achievement Award.

Lisa Mibach (NIC Board Member 1988) has had several careers. In her present career in government administration and knowledge sharing, she has been a Principal in Heritage Resource Management Associates since 1989 and a Principal in Perygrine Editing since 2010. From 1997 – 2013, she was a Partner in CoLexicon, data tagging for heritage collections. In her first career in museum conservation, she was Conservator at Museo Archeologico in Florence from 1967 – 1970, Conservator at the Smithsonian Institution-Conservation Analytical Lab from 1970-1972, Chief of the Heritage Conservation Division of Parks Canada, National Historic Parks and Sites from 1973- 1978, Chief of Conservation for Alberta Culture - Museum and Historic Sites from 1980 – 1985, and Director of the Intermuseum Conservation Association from 1986-1988. She was Site Conservator on archaeological excavations in Italy, Yugoslavia, Iraq, Canada (L'Anse aux Meadows NFLD, Kitselas BC, Deschênes, Gatineau QC). She earned a BA from Mills College of the University of California- Berkeley in 1966 and took courses in management at the Canada School of Public Service in 1973-1976. She received accreditation from the Canadian Association of Professional Conservators in 1972.

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Lee Nelson (NCAC Architectural Conservation Study Committee 1973-1980) (1927- 1994) earned an undergraduate degree in architecture from the University of Oregon School of Architecture and Allied Arts in 1957 and a Masters in Architecture from the University of Illinois in 1958.  In 1958, he joined the National Park Service. From 1960 to 1972, he worked in the NPS Division of Design and Construction in Philadelphia, where, in connection with the 1976 bicentennial, he led a team to restore Independence Hall. In 1979, he became Chief of NPS Technical Preservation Services, a position he held until he retired in 1990. From 1990 to 1993, he led the restoration of exterior stonework at the White House. He cofounded both the Association for Preservation Technology International and the National Center for Preservation Technology and Training Center, which named a building in his honor. The U.S. Department of the Interior bestowed its Distinguished Service Award on him in 1988 for his career as a historical architect and preservationist. He is credited with developing the idea of the National Park Service's "Preservation Briefs". Among his many publications are A Century of Oregon Covered Bridges and Historic American Building Survey: An Architectural Study of Fort McHenry. He wrote historic structure reports on Independence Hall and Old City Hall in Philadelphia. His Nail Chronology has served for decades as a guide for dating historic buildings in America.

Debra Hess Norris (Heritage Preservation Board Member 1997-2006, 2012-2015, Vice Chair 2001-2002, Chair 2003-2006) is the Vice Provost for Graduate and Professional Education, Chair of the Art Conservation Department, and Professor of Photograph Conservation at the University of Delaware. She graduated magna cum laude with an interdisciplinary BA degree in chemistry, art history, and studio art (1977) and a MS in conservation (1980) from the University of Delaware. Since 1985, she has authored more than 30 articles and book chapters on the care and treatment of photographic materials, emergency response, ethics, and conservation education; taught more than 95 workshops and seminars for conservators and allied professionals; and lectured and consulted on the preservation of photographic collections worldwide, including in Russia, India, Lebanon, Denmark, France, Finland, the Netherlands, Mexico, Israel, Australia, and New Zealand. She was Chair of the American Institute for Conservation Ethics and Standards Committee from 1990-1993 and President of the AIC from 1993- 1997. She served as the chair of Heritage Preservation from 2003- 2008. . In October 2009, she and Vinod Daniel were co-chairs for the Salzburg Global Seminar that convened sixty invited delegates from around the world in Salzburg, Austria to address pressing challenges associate with the preservation of our global cultural heritage. In 2002, she was inducted into the University of Delaware’s Alumni Wall of Fame. In January 2004, she was appointed as the Henry Francis du Pont Chair in Fine Arts. She received the Rutherford John Gettens Merit Award for outstanding service to the American Institute for Conservation (1998), the Sheldon and Caroline Keck Award for excellence in the education and training of conservation professionals (2004), and the American Institute for Conservation University Products Award for distinguished achievement in the conservation of cultural property (2008).

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Sherelyn Ogden (Heritage Preservation Board Member 2004-2010) has been the head of conservation at the Minnesota Historical Society since 1999. She trained in conservation at the Newberry Library in Chicago where she worked for five years. She held the positions of Director of Field Services at the Midwest Art Conservation Center and the Director of Book Conservation at the Northeast Document Conservation Center. She is the author of Preservation of Library and Archival Materials: A Manual, Preservation Planning: Guidelines for Writing a Long-Range Preservation Plan, and Caring for American Indian Objects: A Practical and Cultural Guide. She is a Fellow of both the American Institute for Conservation and the International Institute for Conservation. She earned a BA at Bucknell University and an MA at the Graduate Library School of the University of Chicago.

Robert Organ (NCAC Education Study Committee 1973-1979) (1917- 2011) worked as a research chemist on a wide range of commercial materials while continuing his post-high school formal education in the evenings. By 1951 he was working as a scientific civil servant in a Post Office quality control laboratory in Birmingham. In that year he transferred to the Research Laboratory of the British Museum where he was a Senior (then Chief) Experimental Officer. While in London he worked closely with the new Department of Conservation at the Institute of Archaeology of the University College London.  In March 1965, he moved to Canada to become Curator of Conservation at the Royal Ontario Museum. In June 1967, he accepted the post of Chief of the Conservation Analytical Laboratory at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington DC and remained there until he retired in April 1982. He helped to develop courses for ICCROM including Scientific Principles for Conservation.  He published more than sixty papers and reviews. He was active in the International Council for Museums Committee for Conservation—particularly the Metals Working Group. In 2005, he was awarded the ICOM-CC Medal for significant contributions to conservation.

Patsy Orlofsky (NIC Secretary 1993) is the Executive Director of the Textile Conservation Workshop in South Salem, NY which she founded in 1977. In the 1980s, she studied in the master's degree program for preservation administration in Columbia University's School of Library Service and served as Program Director for the New York State Conservation Consultancy. She served on the board of directors of the National Institute for Conservation of Cultural Property, the American Institute for Conservation’s Ethics and Standards Committee and Kress Conservation Publication Fellowship Committee, and the Collections Committee at the Cooper-Hewitt Museum. She is the author of Quilts of America. She earned a BS from Skidmore College in 1965 and studied art history and Spanish at the University of Barcelona in the late 1960s.

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Julie A. Page (Heritage Preservation Board Member 2009-2015, Secretary 2013-2015) is Co-Coordinator for both the Western States & Territories Preservation Assistance Service (WESTPAS) and the California Preservation Program, an initiative of the California State Library. She is a trainer for the WESTPAS workshop “Protecting Cultural Collections: Disaster Prevention, Preparedness, Response & Recovery” and is a member of the Foundation for Advancement in Conservation’s  National Heritage Responders. She has presented on disaster topics for libraries, archives, and museums and has published in the areas of preservation education and disaster preparedness. She established the San Diego/Imperial County Libraries Disaster Response Network and is currently working with the San Diego County Office of Emergency Services and the California Office of Emergency Services to incorporate cultural and historic resources into local and state emergency response and recovery plans.

Nicholas A. Pappas (NCAC Architectural Conservation Study Committee 1973-1980was an architect in the Washington, DC firm Yerkes, Pappas and Parker from 1956- 1982 designing houses and Metro Stations before focusing his career on historic preservation and the restoration of  historic buildings including the Headquarters of the National Trust for Historic Preservation. From 1982 – 1991, he was the Resident Architect for the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation. He retired from architectural practice in 2004. He earned a Masters in Architecture from Auburn University in 1951 and attended the Attingham Park Summer School in 1974.

Beverly Perkins (Heritage Preservation Board Member 2012-2015, Treasurer 2013-2015) is Chief Conservator of The Buffalo Bill Center of the West and adjunct faculty in Art History at Northwest College.  Prior to coming to Wyoming, she was a conservator at the Brooklyn Museum. She is a Fellow of the American Institute for Conservation and the International Institute for Conservation. She has served on the boards of directors of the Western Association for Art Conservation and the Colorado-Wyoming Association of Museums. She served as the NEH Western Field Service Officer and the coordinator of the IMLS Connecting to Collections Planning Project for Wyoming. She is a certified AIC-CERT emergency responder for cultural institutions. She coordinated the American Institute for Conservation volunteer response to Hurricane Katrina and participated on the ground in Mississippi and Louisiana after Katrina and in Haiti after Hurricane Matthew. In 2019, she received the Sheldon & Caroline Keck Award from the American Institute for Conservation.

Roy Perkinson (NCAC Board Member 1977-1981, Heritage Preservation Board Member 1997-2000) joined the staff of the Museum of Fine Arts Boston in 1970 where he trained in paper conservation under F. W. Dolloff. When he retired in 2006, he was Head of the Virginia Herrick Deknatel Paper Conservation Laboratory. Since his retirement he has spent his time painting and has exhibited in many group and solo exhibitions. He translated and edited The Restoration of Engravings, Drawings, Books, and Other Works on Paper by Max Schweidler. He earned a BS from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1964. He took time off from his undergraduate studies at MIT to study painting in Dallas, TX with Chapman Kelley. After receiving his BA, he worked at the MIT Instrumentation Lab (now Draper Laboratory) on a project relating to guidance systems for rockets and took post-grad courses in art history at MIT. He then enrolled in Boston University from which he earned an MA in the history of art in 1968. 

Paul N. Perrot, who served as the Assistant Secretary for Museums at the Smithsonian from 1972-1984, began his career at The Cloisters, Metropolitan Museum Art where he was an Assistant from 1948-1952. He came to the Corning Museum of Glass in 1952 as assistant to the Director and served as Director from 1960-1972. After leaving the Smithsonian, he was Director of the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts from 1984-1991 and the Santa Barbara Museum of Art from 1991- 1994.  He was the Editor of Glass Studies from 1959-1972. He served as Chair of the Advisory Committee of the World Monuments Fund, Vice President and Council member of the American Association of Museums (1967-1978), President and Council member of International Centre for Conservation in Rome (ICCROM) from 1974-1988, and Vice President and member of the ICOM (International Council of Museums) Council. In 1982, he was named Chevalier de l’ Ordre des Arts et Lettres. He studied at the Ecole du Louvre and the Institute of Fine Arts in the late 1940s and early 1950s.

Harold L. Peterson (NCAC Board Member 1975-1976, NCAC Education Study Committee 1973-1978)) (1922 -1978) earned a BA from Drew University in Madison, NJ in 1945. He then went to work at the Wisconsin Historical Society while simultaneously pursuing an MA in history at the University of Wisconsin (1947). His entire professional career was with the National Park Service. From 1963 until his death, he held the title of Curator. During his career he was consultant to many organizations and museums as an expert on historical arms and armor. He was a leader of the Eastern National Park and Monument Association. In 1949, he co-founded a group which eventually formalized into the Company of Military Historians. He served on the Board of Governors for the organization from 1949-1972 and as President from 1960-63. He was elected a Fellow of the organization in 1957. He recorded his own performances of classic military music and wrote a book on drinks called Cups of Valor under the pseudonym N. E. Beveridge.

Wynne Phelan (Heritage Preservation Board Member 2006-2010) studied conservation at the Conservation Center of the New York University Institute of Fine Arts. She was an intern in paper conservation at the Museum of Modern Art in New York in 1972-1973. She moved to Houston in 1973. She worked at the Museum of Fine Arts Houston for many years, establishing the paper lab in 1990 and retiring as Director of Conservation in 2012.

Morgan W. Phillips (NCAC Architectural Conservation Study Committee 1973-1980) (1943–1996) was an undergraduate at Yale and went on to become one of the first graduates from Columbia University's pioneering MA program in Historic Preservation. He worked for most of his career at the Society for the Preservation of New England Antiquities (SPNEA) in Boston (now Historic New England) beginning in the late 1960s as a Curatorial Assistant and by 1971 was Supervisor of Buildings. The organization's Conservation Center was largely built around his research and that of his apprentices. In the early 1990s, he went into private practice in Canajoharie, New York. He is credited with coining the term "architectural conservation" in the early 1970s and was among the first to call himself an architectural conservator. He pioneered a number of techniques that became standard in the field including the microscopic examination of historic paint layers, the use of epoxies for wood repairs, and the acrylic consolidation of fragile historic material. He was among the first to investigate the properties of historic mortars, convening a landmark conference on the subject in Boston in 1973.

Jerry Podany (Heritage Preservation Board Member 2004-2005) now a consultant in the private sector and for institutions, joined the Department of Antiquities Conservation at the J. Paul Getty Museum in Malibu, California in 1978.  He retired from the Getty in 2016 as Senior Conservator/Head of Department, a position he held since 1985. He served as an adjunct professor at University of Southern California and has regularly lectured at Columbia University, NYU and UCLA. He developed a series of collaborative conferences addressing the protection of museum collections from earthquake damage in Turkey, Greece, Japan, Italy and China.  He received his conservation education at the Institute of Archaeology, University of London  From 1999 – 2003 he served two terms as President of the American Institute for Conservation and from 2006 to 2012 served two-terms as  President of the International Institute for Conservation. As President of the IIC, he initiated a series of global roundtable discussions addressing the interaction between contemporary social concerns and the preservation of heritage.   He is an elected Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries of London. He received the Rutherford John Gettens Award from the American Institute for Conservation and the Engineering Research Institute’s Heritage Innovation Prize.
 

Frazer G. Poole (NCAC Library and Archives Study Committee 1973-1980, NCAC Education Study Committee 1973-1979) (1916-1999) graduated from Catawba College in Salisbury NC in 1937 and enrolled in graduate school at the University of North Carolina in 1941. After active duty in Navy from 1943-1946, he studied botany at UC- Berkeley in 1947-48. He earned a BA in library science from UC-Berkeley in 1949. He was a librarian at UC-Santa Barbara from 1950-1959. In 1959, he became the first director of the American Library Association’s Library Technical Project. In 1963, he became Library Director for University of Illinois- Chicago Circle and in 1967 he became the Assistant Director for Preservation at the Library of Congress. He retired from the Library of Congress in 1978. Upon his retirement, he received a Distinguished Service Award in recognition of his extraordinary achievement in the establishment and development of the Library's preservation program. After his retirement he continued to contribute to the field of conservation as chief of library materials and preservation for UNESCO, with assignments in the Middle East and Latin America. He received a Doctor of Humane Letters from St. John Fisher College in Rochester, NY in 1975.

Peter Gallaudet Powers (NCAC Board Member 1977-1981) (1930-2006) was the first General Counsel of the Smithsonian Institution, serving from 1964 until his retirement in 1995. In that position, he played an important role in the planning, construction and operation of Smithsonian museums and helped establish Smithsonian Magazine, the Smithsonian Associates continuing education program and the Office of Product Development and Licensing. Prior to joining the Smithsonian, he clerked in New Orleans for Federal judge J. Skelly Wright, did legal work for the Federal Power Commission, and was an associate at the Hogan and Hartson law firm. He served as President of the Capitol Hill Restoration Society and in 1967 was the first treasurer of the Washington Conservation Guild. In 1990, he received the Harrison Tweed Award from the American Law Institute-American Bar Association for founding the museum administration conference. In 1995 he was a recipient of the Smithsonian's Henry Medal. He earned a BA from Magdalen College (Oxford University) and a JD Harvard Law School in 1957.

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F. Blair Reeves (NCAC Architectural Conservation Study Committee 1973-1980) (1923-2012) served as a member of the faculty of Architecture at the University of Florida from 1949 to 1987 when he became Professor Emeritus. Throughout his academic career hr was very active in the area of architectural preservation. He was an active participant in HABS (Historic American Building Survey) which was founded in 1933. During the summer months he involved his students in projects which were organized to locate and preserve buildings uniquely valuable for their historic and architectural significance to the state of Florida that would otherwise be lost through reckless renovation or razing. He served as chair of the UF Bicentennial Committee. He was involved with teaching, planning, and supervising the annual summer program at Nantucket known as Preservation Institute: Nantucket (PI:N). He was Director of the Research and Education Center for Architectural Preservation (RECAP) from 1983 to 1986. A Trustee Emeritus of the National Trust for Historic Preservation and one of the founders of the Florida Trust for Historic Preservation, he received the National Trust's Louise du Pont Crowninshield Award. He also received the Department of Interior's Conservation Service Award and Florida Trust's 1998 Evelyn Fortune Bartlett Award for Lifetime Achievement in Preservation Stewardship. Other honors included National Council for Preservation Education's Award for Distinguished Leadership, AIA Presidential Citation, and Florida Trust's Distinguished Service Award. In 1988, the Governor and Cabinet of Florida passed a resolution acknowledging his many contributions to the preservation movement. In 1995, the Beinecke-Reeves Distinguished Professor Chair in Architectural Preservation was established. In 2005, he received the Senator Bob Williams Award given in recognition of his public service.

 

Lawrence L. Reger (NIC/Heritage Preservation Board Member 1987-2015, NIC/Heritage Preservation President 1988-2015) served as President of Heritage Preservation (and its predecessor the National Institute for Conservation) from 1988 until February 2015. Prior to that he was a private consultant for the Rockefeller Foundation and Cleveland Center for Contemporary Art, Director of the American Association of Museums (1978-1986), Director of Program Development and Coordination, Director of Planning and Management and General Counsel for the National Endowment for the Arts (1970- 1978), and practiced law in Lincoln at Crosby, Guenzel, Davis, Kessner & Kuester.  He received the Forbes Medal from the American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works in recognition for his distinguished contribution to the field of conservation. He earned a BA from the University of Nebraska- Lincoln in 1961 and a JD from Vanderbilt University in 1964.

Dr. George Reilly (NCAC Scientific Support Study Committee 1973-1980) received his PhD from the University of Massachusetts- Amherst. He was a scientist and conservation coordinator in the Research Division of the Henry Francis du Pont Winterthur Museum from 1971 into the 1990s. He was a professor in chemistry and biochemistry department at the University of Delaware from 1997 – 2000.

Julie Reilly (Heritage Preservation Board Member 1999-2008, Treasurer 2002- 2005) has been Executive Director of ICA Art Conservation since 2017. She worked as an objects conservator for the Smithsonian’s American History Museum, the NPS Applied Archeology Center, the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, and the Winterthur Museum and Gardens. She served as Adjunct Associate Professor for the Winterthur/University of Delaware Program in Art Conservation and Adjunct Professor for the Museum Studies Department of the University of Nebraska. She was Associate Director for the Nebraska State Historical Society for fourteen years before joining the Gerald R. Ford Conservation Center in Omaha  as Associate Director in 1995. She held the title of Director in 2009 when she left to become Director of Development at KANEKO, a nonprofit Omaha center for exhibitions, performance, lectures and education. When she left KANEKO, she became Executive Director of the Joslyn Castle, an urban historic mansion. From 2015 until 2017, she was Executive Director of Omaha by Design, a nonprofit that promotes excellence in urban design and policy. She is coauthor of Preventive Conservation for Historic House Museums, an Associate Editor for the Journal of the American Institute for Conservation, a Fellow of the American Institute for Conservation. She has served as a member of the AIC Collections Care Professional Task Force, was a Peer Professional for the General Services Administration’s Building Services Excellence in Architecture Program, and served for many years on the Board of Heritage Preservation. She earned a BA in anthropology from Towson State University (Towson, MD) and a MA in anthropology from George Washington University (Washington, DC).  She completed studies at the Getty Museum Leadership Institute and holds a certificate in fundraising management from the University of Nebraska, Omaha.

 

Mervin Richard (Heritage Preservation Board Member 1997-2012, Vice Chair 2003-2006, Chair 2007-2012) is Chief of Conservation at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, where he has worked since 1984 and has been Chief Conservator since 2009.  Prior to joining the National Gallery staff, he worked as a painting conservator at the Intermuseum Conservation Association in Oberlin, Ohio, the Philadelphia Museum of Art, and the Winterthur Museum. He has been an adjunct professor of painting conservation in the graduate program at the University of Delaware/Winterthur Museum. He has served as co-chair of the International Council of Museums Committee on Conservation Working Group for Preventive Conservation and  Working Group for Works of Art in Transit. From 1998 to 2013, he was a member of the board of directors of Heritage Preservation, serving as Chair from 2008-2015. He earned Bachelor degrees in chemistry and art history from the University of Delaware and completed his graduate studies in conservation at Oberlin College in 1978.

Joseph Rishel (NIC Board Member 1987-1989), Curator Emeritus of  the Philadelphia Museum of Art has been associated with the Museum since 1972, most recently as the Gisela and Dennis Alter Senior Curator of European Painting before 1900, and Senior Curator of the John G. Johnson Collection and the Rodin Museum at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, positions from which he retired in 2016. He was employed at the Art Institute of Chicago prior to joining the Philadelphia Museum of Art. In 2011-2012, he was Samuel H. Kress Professor at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC.  He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and a chevalier of the Ordre des Arts et des Lettres. He earned a BA from Hobart and William Smith College in 1962 and was a member of the team that became the undefeated champions of the G.E. College Bowl in 1961.

Clements L. Robertson (NCAC Regional Centers Study Committee 1973-1976) (1920-2016), a graduate of the Kansas City Art Institute, apprenticed with and assisted James Roth at the William Rockhill Nelson Gallery of Art  from 1949 until 1963, when he was hired away by the City Art Museum of St Louis  (now Saint Louis Art Museum) to found its conservation lab. He remained there until his retirement in 1987. He served as President of the American Institute for Conservation from 1974- 1976.

Carolyn Rose (NIC Chair 1985-1989)  (1949-2002) was head of the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of Natural History Anthropology Conservation Laboratory from 1977- 1988. In 1990, she was named Senior Research Conservator at the NMNH and became Chairman of the museum’s Anthropology Department in 2000. She established the Museum Studies Program at George Washington University in association with the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of Natural History. She helped to establish a training program for conservators in Argentina and a Latin American Scholarship Program. She served as the Chair of the Board of the National Institute for Conservation from 1985 to 1989. She was President of the Society for the Preservation of Natural History Collections from 1994-1995, President of the Washington Conservation Guild, and a founding member of the Board of Directors of the World Council for Collection Resources. She published numerous papers on issues of collection storage and management. She was awarded the President’s Medal from George Washington University.  In 1992, the American Institute for Conservation awarded her the Rutherford John Gettens Merit Award and in 18997 it awarded her the University Products Award for distinguished achievement in the field of conservation. She received Exceptional Service Awards from the National Museum of Natural History in 1996, 1997, and 1998. In 2001, she was awarded the Society for the Preservation of Natural History Collections (SPNHC) President's Award for distinguished service. She earned a BA from Sweet Briar College in 1971 and an MA from George Washington University in 1976.

Ann Russell (NIC Treasurer 1986) served as Executive Director of the Northeast Document Conservation Center from 1978-2008.  Prior to that, she was Assistant Director of the DeCordova Museum in Lincoln, Massachusetts. She is an adjunct faculty member at the Simmons College Graduate School of Library and Information Science. She served on the boards of directors of the National Institute for Conservation and the Intermuseum Association in Oberlin, Ohio and on committees of the American Library Association and the Society of American Archivists. In 2009, she was awarded the second annual LBI (Library Binding Institute) George Cunha and Susan Swartzburg Preservation Award. She earned a BA in English from Harvard University and a Ph.D. in English literature from Brandeis University.

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Susanne P. Sack (NCAC Board Member 1977-1981) trained with Sheldon and Caroline Keck  and worked with them at the Brooklyn Museum beginning in the late 1950s. She rose through the ranks at the museum, becoming assistant conservator in 1960 and Chief Conservator by the mid-1960s. After her retirement from the Brooklyn Museum in the 1980s, she opened a private conservation practice in Brooklyn.  She was among the first group of conservators flown into Italy after the Florence Flood of November 1966. She was President of the International Institute for Conservation in 1986-1989. Over the years, she was a member of many committees of the American Institute for Conservation. In 1990, she was awarded the AIC  Rutherford John Gettens Award. She graduated from Wellesley College in 1953.

Frank Sanchis (NIC Board Member 1997-1999) has been Director of United States Programs at the World Monuments Fund since 2010. Prior to joining the WMF, he served as Senior Advisor to the Municipal Art Society, Vice President for Stewardship of Historic Sites for the National Trust for Historic Preservation, and Executive Director of the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission. He is the author of American Architecture: Westchester County, New York. He serves on the boards of the Catskill Center for Conservation and Development, The Preservation League of New York State, and the City Club on New York City. He earned a B.A. in architecture from Pratt Institute and an M.S. in historic preservation from Columbia University.

Dr. Edward V. Sayre (NCAC Board Member 1977-1981, NCAC Scientific Support Study Committee 1973-1980) (1919-2007) earned a BS in Chemical Technology from Iowa State College in 1941. He worked on the Manhattan Project from 1942 to 1945 and after World War II completed his Ph.D. at Columbia University in the physical chemistry of rare earth elements. He worked at the Kodak Research Laboratory and became a senior chemist at Brookhaven National Laboratory in 1952. In addition to his duties at Brookhaven, he taught the chemistry of conservation at the New York University Institute of Fine Arts Conservation Center. He was Director of the Research Laboratory at the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston from 1974 until 1984. After his retirement, he took the job of directing and influencing archaeological and conservation research at the Smithsonian Center for Materials Research and Education. Patterns and Process: A Festschrift in Honor of Dr. Edward V. Sayre was published by the Smithsonian Center for Materials Research and Education in 2003.

Nancy Schamu (Heritage Preservation Secretary 2004-2008) went to work at the Maryland Historical Trust in 1969 after earning a BA in history from Hollins College  and an MA in history at Virginia Tech. She remained there until 1980 working her way up to Deputy SHPO. From 1987 until her retirement in 2013, she worked for the National Conference of State Historic Preservation Officers  (NCSHPO). Among the projects she worked on were stopping the construction of interstate highways from destroying historic resources in Maryland; getting the 1992 amendments to NHPA passed; rescuing the tax credits in 1986; working with the National Trust to get historic buildings included in the Americans with Disabilities Act; rewriting Section 106 regulations in the early 1980s and 1990s, and fighting to maintain continued funding for the states through the Historic Preservation Fund.

Elisabeth K. Schulte (Heritage Preservation Board Member 2006-2015, Vice Chair 2008-2012) studied art history, studio art and chemistry at Mount Holyoke College. After internships at the Boston Museum of Fine Arts and the Yale Center for British Art, she pursued her graduate degree in works on paper conservation at the Winterthur/University of Delaware program in art conservation. She worked at the Conservation Center for Art and Historic Artifacts in Philadelphia for a decade before moving to Atlanta in 1993 and establishing Elizabeth Kaiser Schulte Conservation of Art and Historic Artifacts on Paper. In 2013 she won the Booth Family Rome Prize in Historic Preservation and Conservation awarded by the American Academy in Rome.

David Schute (NCAC/NIC Executive Director 1973-1987)
 

Merrily A. Smith (NIC Secretary 1988) studied bookbinding with George Baer and paper conservation with Paul Banks at the Newberry Library.  In 1978, she joined the staff of the Library of Congress Restoration Office as a Paper Conservator. She retired from the Library of Congress in 2012.  Prior to moving to Washington, DC she had a private conservation practice in Duluth, MN. She was President of the Washington Conservation Guild from 1983- 1985. She was Director of the ILFA Strategic Programme on Preservation and Conservation in the late 1980s and early 1990s. She earned a BA from  the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities in 1968.

Dr Peter G. Sparks who was a founder and first Director of the Winterthur/University of Delaware Art Conservation Graduate Program from 1974- 1981, was appointed Director of the Preservation Office of the Library of Congress in February 1981. He left the Library of Congress in 1989 to begin a conservation consulting business. Prior to his association with the Winterthur/UD program, he was a member of the faculty of the University of Delaware Chemistry Department from 1969- 1974. He served as President of the Board of the Conservation Center for Artistic and Historic Artifacts in Philadelphia. He is the author of many articles and studies on deacidification. He earned a BA in  1961 and a PhD in physical chemistry in 1968 from the University of Pennsylvania.

John Spencer (NCAC/NIC Treasurer 1981-1984) (1923- 1994) joined the U.S. Army Air Corps in 1941 and flew as a bombardier over Italy during World War II. After the war, he attended Grinnell College, earning a BA in 1947. He earned a second BA from the Universite Laval, Quebec in 1948. He attended Yale University for his graduate work, earning an MA in Romance Languages (French) in 1950. He completed a second MA at Yale in art history in 1951. He began lecturing at Yale in 1952 while working on a PhD which was awarded in 1953. He taught at Yale until 1958 when he became professor and (acting) Chairman of the art department of the  University of Florida. In 1962 he accepted a joint appointment as Director of the Allen Museum of Art and professor at Oberlin University. He remained in Oberlin until 1972 when he became head of the Museum Program at the National Endowment for the Arts. In 1978 he joined the Department of Art and Art History at Duke University as Professor of art and department Chair. He was appointed Director of the Duke University Museum of Art (now the Nasher Museum of Art) in 1982. He retired in 1986.

Dr. Victoria Steele (Heritage Preservation Board Member 1999-2006, Treasurer 1999-2001) has been Curator of the UCLA Public Art Collection since 2018. From 1988- 2000, she was head of Special Collections at the University of Southern California. From 2000-2009, she was head of Special Collections  at the UCLA Library. From 2009- 2014, she was the Brooke Russell Astor Director of Collections Strategy for the New York Public Library. From 2014- 2015, she was Head of the William Andrews Clark Memorial Library at UCLA. From 2015- 2016, she was Curator of Humanities Centers, Programs, and Collections at UCLA.  She is the coauthor of Becoming a Fundraiser: The Principles and Practice of Library Development. She is a past recipient of a Fulbright Fellowship and the Order of the Golden Bruin, an honorary organization for those who have provided exemplary service to UCLA. She earned a B.A. in art history and an M.L.S. from UCLA as well as an M.A. and Ph.D. from USC.

Dr. Joyce Hill Stoner joined the staff of the Henry Francis DuPont Winterthur Museum and Gardens  as  paintings conservator in 1976 and was appointed head of the conservation section in 1980. She served as Director of the Winterthur/University of Delaware Program in Art Conservation from 1982 -1997 and became Chair in 1990 when WUDPAC became part of a department in Art Conservation Research. She resigned as Chair in 1997. She is now the Director of the University of Delaware Preservation Studies Doctoral Program which she founded. She was a Kress Visiting Scholar with John Brealey at the Metropolitan Museum (1980), and a Getty Visiting Scholar with Andrea Rothe at the Getty Museum (1985). She served as Executive Director for the Foundation of the American Institute for Conservation (now Foundation for Advancement in Conservation) from 1975-1979, has been coordinator of the FAIC oral history project since 1975, was Managing Editor of Art and Archaeology Technical Abstracts from 1969-1985, and has been a grant reviewer for the NMA, IMS, FAIC, Kress, and Getty Grant Program. She served as Vice President of the College Art Association and was Vice President of the International Institute for Conservation. She was a member of the Board of Heritage Preservation and was involved in research on preservation of outdoor murals through Heritage Preservation's Rescue Public Murals project. She has written over 80 articles or book chapters and co-edited The Conservation of Easel Paintings.  She was guest curator of the show FACTORY WORK: WARHOL, WYETH, AND BASQUIAT which appeared in three venues in 2006-07. She was co-curator for the exhibition, WYETH VERTIGO at the Shelburne Museum in the summer of 2013. She was awarded the AIC University Products Lifetime Achievement Award in 2003, the AIC Paintings Specialty Group Award for outstanding contributions to the field of paintings conservation in 2011 and the College Art Association/ Heritage Preservation Award for Distinction in Scholarship and Conservation in 2011. She earned a BA from  the College of William and Mary in 1968, an MA from the New York University Institute of Fine Arts in 1970, a Diploma in Conservation from the New York University Institute of Fine Arts Conservation Center in 1973, and a PhD from the University of Delaware in 1995.

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F. Christopher Tahk (NCAC Scientific Support Study Committe 1973-1979, Chair 1977-1979) is a 1975 alumnus of the Cooperstown Graduate Program in the Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works. He served as an art conservation faculty member and director of the program from 1983 to 2004 during which time he oversaw its transition to Buffalo State in 1987. He was named a SUNY Distinguished Service Professor in 1997 and he received two awards from the American Institute for Conservation -- the Conservation Advocacy Award (2004) and the Sheldon and Caroline Keck Award (1997). Upon his retirement in 2004, an endowed fellowship was established in his name. In 2015, the conservation science teaching lab was named for him.

Thomas Taylor (NIC APT Rep 1988) has been a Professor of Historic Preservation at the Savannah College of Art and Design  since  2001 and  a consultant conducting building condition assessments, diagnosing decay and deterioration mechanisms, and preparing conservation treatment proposals and reports since 2018. From 1980 – 2008, he was Director of Architectural Collections Management and Conservation at the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation. From 1973- 1980, he was Unit Chief of the  Grants in Aid Program of the National Park Service’s National Register of Historic Places. He earned a Bachelor of  Architectural History and Criticism ( 1971) and  a  Master’s Degree in Architectural History and Criticism (1973) from the University of Virginia and a PhD in American Studies from The George Washington University Columbian College of Arts & Sciences (1989).

Jonathan Thornton (Heritage Preservation Board Member 1997-2000) has taught objects conservation in the Patricia H. and Richard E. Garman Art Conservation Department State University of New York College at Buffalo (SUNY Buffalo State) since 1980. Following an earlier career as an artist/silversmith, he studied conservation in this program when it was located in Cooperstown, NY, earning an MA and Certificate of Advanced Studies from the State University College of Oneonta. He completed internships in the metalwork, stained glass and woodwork/gilding departments of the Victoria and Albert Museum and the archaeological conservation laboratories of the Museum of London. He was a Rome Prize recipient in 1999 researching the materials and techniques of molding and casting while a Fellow at the American Academy in Rome. He is a substantial contributor to The Conservation of Furniture (Butterworths). He was an editor for Art and Archaeology Technical Abstracts for ten years. He served on the Board of Heritage Preservation for many years. He is also an expert craftsman, interested in traditional handmade tools and historic technologies.

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Dianne van der Reyden joined the Smithsonian Institution in 1981 and served as head of paper conservation at the Smithsonian Center for Materials Research and Education (called the Conservation Analytical Laboratory until 1996) from 1984- 2002. In 2002 she came to the Library of Congress to serve as Chief of the Conservation Division. She was named Director for Preservation in 2005, a position she held until her  retirement in 2012. She is a Fellow of the American Institute for Conservation and International Institute for Conservation. She earned a BA in fine arts from Virginia Commonwealth University and a MA in art history from New York University. She has diplomas in conservation and paper conservation from the New York University Institute of Fine Arts Conservation Center and from the Fogg Art Museum at Harvard University.

Charles van Ravenswaay (NCAC Vice Chair 1973-1975) (1911-1990) served as State Superintendent of the Missouri Writer's Project, producing Missouri: The WPA Guide to the "Show Me" State in 1941. He served as Director of the Missouri Historical Society from 1946–1962, and as President of the American Association of Museums (now American Alliance of Museums) from 1961–1962. In 1962 he accepted the position of President of Old Sturbridge Village, Sturbridge, Massachusetts, a position he held until 1966. In 1966, he was named Director of the Henry Francis du Pont Winterthur Museum and Gardens, in Wilmington, Delaware, where he remained until his retirement in 1976. After his retirement, he published three books The Arts and Architecture of German Settlements in Missouri: A Survey of a Vanishing Culture (University of Missouri Press, 1977), A Nineteenth Century Garden (Main Street Press/Universe Books, 1977), and Drawn from Nature. The Botanical Art of Joseph Prestele and His Sons (Smithsonian Institution Press, 1984). He was President of the American Association of Museums from 1961 to 1968 and served on national historical and horticultural committees including the University of Delaware Library Associates, the National Trust for Historic Preservation, the Advisory Committee of the Eleutherian Mills Hagley Foundation, and the Carostead Foundation (Tudor Place) in Washington, DC. He earned a BA (1933) and MA (1934) from Washington University in St. Louis, received an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters from Maryville College of the Sacred Heart in St. Louis in 1968, and an honorary Doctor of Humanities from the University of Missouri in 1980.

Dianne van der Reyden (Heritage Preservation Board Member 2006-2012)
 

Lambertus (Bert) van Zelst (NIC APT Rep 1988) earned a PhD in Chemistry from the University of Amsterdam. He was a Research Associate at the Institute for Nuclear Physics Research in Amsterdam, a Research Associate at Brookhaven National Laboratory, the Research Chemist at the Metropolitan Museum of Art (1977-1984), and Director of the Conservation Analytical Laboratory/Smithsonian Center for Materials Research and Education, Smithsonian Institution from 1984 until his retirement in July 2003. In 2005, he was a visiting scholar at the Library of Congress Preservation Division. He served on the ICCROM Council from 1988- 2000 in several capacities including Council Chair.

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Marilyn Weidner (NIC APT Rep 1988)  (1928- 2017) graduated from Hofstra University with a BA in French and a minor in art history. Upon graduation from college, she worked as an assistant to Dorothy Dudley, the Registrar at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City . She then became the Registrar at the Brooklyn Museum.  While at the Brooklyn Museum, she attended a course in painting conservation and became interested in the conservation field.   Having decided to concentrate on conserving prints and other art on paper, she studied with Minna Horowitz Nagel at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and studied Japanese mounting techniques with Takashi Sugiura at the Freer Gallery in Washington, D.C.  Upon finishing her studies she set up a private studio in Philadelphia.  In 1966, she responded to the call to assist with conservation efforts after the flood in Florence, Italy. In 1971 and 1972, she planned seminars held at the Institute of Paper Chemistry in Wisconsin which brought together paper conservators and paper scientists for the first time.  In 1972, she invented the suction table to aid in the treatment and removal of stains from art on paper.  In 1977 she started the Conservation Center for Art and Historic Artifacts (CCAHA), a non-profit laboratory which provided conservation services to small museums which did not have their own conservation facilities. She left the CCAHA in 1984 and returned to private practice. She was a member of the Washington Conservation Guild, an honorary Fellow of the International Institute for Conservation, and a Fellow and honorary member of the American Institute for Conservation. 

Norman R. Weiss is Vice President of MCC Materials and Director of Scientific Research at Integrated Conservation Resources, Inc.  He has taught at Columbia University’s Graduate School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation since 1977 and is a visiting faculty member at New York University and the Royal Institute of Art, Stockholm. He is Consultant Editor of the Journal of Architectural Conservation, and Chairman of the Preservation Technology and Training Board of the National Park Service. He is a Fellow of the Association for Preservation Technology, the American Institute for Conservation, and the Society of Antiquaries of London. He was awarded the American Institute for Conservation’s Sheldon and Caroline Keck Award in 2018. He trained as an analytical chemist at  New York University (BA,1968) and MIT.

Gordon Roland Williams (1914-1996) attended Stanford University. During World War II, he served as a navigator in the Pacific. In 1945, he became Vice President of the international bookselling firm Brentano's in California and managed its Los Angeles shop. In 1952, he became Chief Assistant Librarian at the University of California at Los Angeles. In 1959, he became Director of the Center for Research Libraries at the University of Chicago and remained in that position until his retirement in 1980. During those years, he created and compiled the National Union Catalog. During retirement in Napa, California, he was a founder of the Napa Valley Wine Library and member of the board of directors. He was a founding member of the International Institute of Conservation.

Norman Weiss (NCAC Architectural Conservation Study Committee 1978-1980, NCAC Scientific Support Study Committee 1973-1979)

Gordon Williams (NCAC Library and Archives Study Committee 1973-1978)

Dr. John C. Williams (NCAC Scientific Support Study Committee 1973-1979earned a BA from Oberlin College in 1931, an MA from Miami University of Oxford in 1933, and a PhD in chemistry from Iowa State University in 1937. From 1938-1942, he was a  Research chemist at Champion Paper and Fibre Co. From 1942- 1945, he was a Fellow of Mellon Institute of Industrial Research studying the synthesis of polyester resins. From 1945-1962 , he was Research Director of Hawley Products Co. of St Charles, IL. From 1962- 1970, he was Vice President of Research at  the Cuno Division of the American Machine and Foundry Co. of Meridan, CT. In January 1971, he was appointed Research Officer at the Preservation Research and Testing Office of the Library of Congress, a position he retired from in February 1981.

Dr. Stephen L. Williams (Heritage Preservation Board Member 2001-2003) (1948 – 2018) earned Bachelors and Masters degrees in Biology and a Masters degree in Museum Science from Texas Tech University. He earned his doctorate in Conservation from the University of Goteborg in Goteborg, Sweden. He began his career at The Museum at Texas Tech University as a collection manager and later moved to Carnegie Museum of Natural History in Pittsburgh, PA. In 1990, he returned to The Museum at Texas Tech and taught Museum Science. In 1995, he moved to The Strecker Museum (now Mayborn Museum Complex) at Baylor University and taught Museum Studies.  After his retirement in 2007, he continued to work with students when needed. In 1985, he was a founding member of the Society for the Preservation of Natural History Collections. In 1999, he received the SPNHC President’s Award for exceptional service to the organization. He was an active researcher and writer, authoring 134 publications.

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Melanie Zucker was head of Heritage Preservation’s Conservation Assessment Program (CAP)  from 2012- 2015. From 2013- 2015, she also worked as a site interpreter at Claude Moore Colonial Farm. After leaving Heritage Preservation, she was Site Manager at Mount Vernon Place Conservancy (2015-2016). Prior to Heritage Preservation she worked at Colonial Williamsburg and Historic St. Mary’s City in Maryland. She earned a BA in history from the College of William and Mary in 2010 and a Masters degree in Museum Studies from the University of Leicester in 2016.