Publications

National Conservation Advisory Council. Conservation of Cultural Property in the United States: A Statement, 1976.

National Conservation Advisory Council. Regional Centers Study Committee. Report from the Regional Centers Study Committee to the National Conservation Advisory Council, 1976.

National Conservation Advisory Council. Study Committee on Architectural Conservation. Report on the Study Committee on Architectural Conservation, 1977.

National Conservation Advisory Council. Study Committee on Libraries and Archives. Report of the Study Committee on Libraries and Archives: National Needs in Libraries and Archives Conservation, 1978.

National Conservation Advisory Council. Discussion Paper on a National Institute for Conservation of Cultural Property, 1978.

National Conservation Advisory Council. Study Committee on Education and Training. Report of the Study Committee on Education and Training, 1979.

National Conservation Advisory Council. Study Committee on Scientific Support for Conservation of Cultural Property. Report of the Study Committee on Scientific Support for Conservation of Cultural Property, 1979.

National Conservation Advisory Council. Conservation Treatment Facilities in the United States, 1980.

National Conservation Advisory Council. Study Committee on Architectural Conservation. Suggested Guidelines for Training in Architectural Conservation: A Supplement to the Report of the Study Committee on Architectural Conservation, 1980.

National Conservation Advisory Council. Proposal for a National Institute for the Conservation of Cultural Property, 1982.

National Institute for the Conservation of Cultural Property. The History and Future Directions of Conservation training in North America, 1984.

Amparo R. de Torres and National Institute for the Conservation of Cultural Property. Collections Care: A Selected Bibliography Based on the Collections Care Information Service, 1990.

Amparo R. de Torres and National Institute for the Conservation of Cultural Property. Collections Care: A Basic Reference Shelflist, 1990.

National Institute for the Conservation of Cultural Property. Training for Collections Care and Maintenance: A Suggested Curriculum, 1990.

Sara Wolf Green and National Institute for the Conservation of Cultural Property. The Conservation Assessment: A Tool for Planning, Implementing, and Fundraising, 1991.

 National Institute for the Conservation of Cultural Property. Emergency Preparedness and Response: Materials Developed from the NIC Seminar, October 17, 1990, Washington DC, 1991.

 

W. Duckworth, Carolyn L. Rose, Hugh H. Genoways and National Institute for the Conservation of Cultural Property. Preserving Natural Science Collections: Chronicle of our Environmental Heritage, 1993.

Long, Jane. "When Disaster Strikes: A National Response." GCI Newsletter 10.1, Spring 1995.

 

Slate, Jane Siena. "Pushing the Conservation Agenda: A Conversation with Lawrence Reger." GCI Newsletter 10.1, Spring 1995.

Shelley Sturman, Julie Unruh, Helen Spande and National Institute for the Conservation of Cultural Property. Maintenance of Outdoor Sculpture: An Annotated Bibliography, 1996.

National Institute for the Conservation of Cultural Property. Training for Collections Care and Maintenance: A Suggested Curriculum.  Volume I.  Archaeology and Ethnography, 1990.

National Institute for the Conservation of Cultural Property. Training for Collections Care and Maintenance: A Suggested Curriculum.  Volume II.  History, 1991.

 

National Institute for the Conservation of Cultural Property. Training for Collections Care and Maintenance: A Suggested Curriculum.  Volume III.  Natural Sciences, 1991.

 

National Institute for the Conservation of Cultural Property. Training for Collections Care and Maintenance: A suggested Curriculum.  Volume IV.  Fine Arts, 1991.

 

National Institute for the Conservation of Cultural Property. Training for Collections Care and Maintenance: A suggested Curriculum.  Volume V, Libraries and Archives, 1991.

 

National Institute for the Conservation of Cultural Property. Designing Outdoor Sculpture Today for Tomorrow, 1996.

Heritage Preservation and the National Parks Service. Caring for Your Historic House, 1998.

A house is considered historic if it is typical of its period, usually more than 50 years old, and significant in either design, materials, workmanship, setting, and/or association. Many people live in historic houses and need to understand the importance of ongoing care and maintenance in preserving the qualities that make their homes and properties unique. Now, 22 leading preservationists provide expert advice, illustrated with photographs and explanatory line drawings, on every aspect of the subject, including:

  • structural systems, roofs, and windows

  • masonry, woodwork, plaster, paint, and wallpapers

  • mechanical and electrical systems

  • kitchens and bathrooms

  • landscaping

  • fire protection, insurance appraisals, and tax and estate planning

  • developing and carrying out a maintenance plan

  • identifying appropriate materials and procedures for repair

  • determining if professional help is needed, and choosing the best help available

Review of Caring for Your Historic House

Cover of the Heritage Preservation and the National Parks Service joint publication Caring for Your Historic House, 1998.

Jane S. Long, William Long, Inge-Lise Eckman, and Heritage Preservation. Caring for Your Family Treasures, 2000.

Review from Library Journal
Although there are plenty of guidebooks on preserving museum-quality antiques, this book is unique in that it focuses on the care and handling of precious family heirlooms such as old silver, wedding gowns, scrapbooks, photos, books, and dolls. It was assembled under the guidance of Heritage Preservation, a nonprofit organization dedicated to preserving cultural artifacts, sites, natural science specimens, buildings, and works of art. (It has also published the highly regarded Caring for Your Collections and, more recently, Caring for Your Historic House.) In addition to providing solid and easy-to-understand information on object preservation, the book offers advice on where to find archival supplies, genealogical information, and, if need be, a professional conservator. The many color photos show how artifactual damage is caused and in some instances how it can be treated. Highly recommended for all public libraries and for decorative arts collections everywhere. Margarete Gross, Chicago P.L. Copyright 2001 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Heritage Preservation. Tips, Tales, & Testimonies to Save Outdoor Sculpture!, 2002.

Heritage Preservation. Cataclysm and Challenge. Impact of September 11, 2001 on Our Nation’s Cultural Heritage, 2002.

 

Heritage Preservation, Federal Emergency Management Agency, and National Endowment for the Arts. Before and After Disasters: Federal Funding for Cultural Institutions, 2005.

 

Heritage Preservation and Institute of Museum and Library Services. A Public Trust at Risk: The Heritage Health Index Report on the State of America’s Collections, 2005.

 

Heritage Preservation. Heritage Emergency National Task Force. Field Guide to Emergency Response, 2006.

 

Ellen Cochran Hirzy, Heritage Preservation, and Institute of Museum and Library Services. Capitalize on Collections Care, 2007.

 

Heritage Preservation. Working with Emergency Responders: Tips for Cultural Institutions, 2009.

Filming the Field Guide for Emergency Response (2006)

"Filming the DVD for the Field Guide to Emergency Response was one of the most memorable things I did with Heritage Preservation. We did a ton of research to write the Guide itself, but when it came to the DVD, we had professionals to write the script, do the narration, and direct and record the video. The best part was that several staff members participated on camera, playing conservator under the direction of a real one, E.D. Tully Rambo. We filmed over the course of a week at a place in Maryland where they train firefighters. It was great because we could mud up a corner to look like a flood scene, then head upstairs to a burned-out room and show how to vacuum ash off textiles. I remember being taught how to gently clean mold off a chair with a Q-Tip early one chilly morning, but at least I didn’t have to wear a Tyvek suit!

I always wanted to see the blooper reel. I remember being on camera and trying to tear a piece of wax paper that just wouldn’t cooperate. I tried again and again and then looked up to suggest starting over, and everybody was laughing their heads off. I must have looked completely silly. There were a lot of moments like that. It was hard work but we had a lot of fun.

We were so excited the day the finished DVD arrived. I remember us gathering in the conference room to watch it. The Field Guide won a couple of awards. I am so proud to have been a part of it."

Diane Mossholder